Takashi in Superflat Wonderland

By Stephanie Rebick | Posted on July 10th, 2013

Takashi Murakami, Superflat Flowers, 2010  © galerie emmanuel perrotin

Takashi Murakami, Superflat Flowers, 2010
© galerie emmanuel perrotin

Takashi Murakami has proven to be one of the most influential artists of the recent era. Through both his own art practice — in which he seamlessly fuses the worlds of high, popular and commerical cultures — and his series of exhibitions that defined the superflat theory, Murakami has played a major role in bringing the Japanese otaku subculture to mainstream Western audiences. His works, both in their engagement with branding and the deliberate infantilization and sexualization of female characters, has been both controversial and a damning critique of the emptiness of contemporary consumer culture. While I’ve had the opportunity to see work by Murakami in group exhibitions, I’ve never had the pleasure of seeing one of his solo shows and I would love to be able to check out Takashi in Superflat Wonderland that recently opened at Plateau – Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul. This major presentation of his work promises to be a reevaluation of the artist’s superflat theory, examining how his unique cast of characters that borrow equally from contemporary Japanese visual culture and the aesthetics of the Edo period function as a larger critique of contemporary culture. If you’re in Seoul this seems like a great exhibition to check out. More information is available here.

Takashi Murakami, Kaikai and Kiki, 2005 © galerie emmanuel perrotin

Takashi Murakami, Kaikai and Kiki, 2005
© galerie emmanuel perrotin


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